Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Obesity: From Aestheticism to Disease

Obesity: From Aestheticism to Disease

By

Maria Teresa De Donato, PhD, RDN, CNC, CMH, CHom



Obesity from an aesthetic, cultural, and psychological perspective


               For a quite long time our Western world has identified obesity primarily as an aesthetic issue.  Hence, it was quite revealing several years ago to watch a documentary that PBS broadcasted on KLRU, which, while focusing on the concept of female beauty, mentioned how the latter is differently perceived and, consequently, defined depending on culture and ethnicity.  One of the main aspects that emerged from that video was the consideration that seeing beauty as synonym of being slim is a phenomenon that characterizes predominantly our white Western society.

            As a matter of fact, according to the information PBS presented on that occasion, African-Americans and Africans in general are usually more prone to associate beauty with harmonious forms rather than with being thin.  This means, for instance, that no matter if a woman is overweight or even obese – at least to a certain extent – as long as she has her ‘right curves’ and is well proportioned, that is her waist and hips are clearly defined, she would still have the potential to be considered as beautiful.

            We all, however, may agree that the concept of beauty has undergone some drastic changes over time.  As a result, what was considered ideal body image, and, therefore, ideal weight in the 50s was already obsolete in the 70s.  During those last forty years, the fashion world, whose goal does not encompasse taking into account one’s own slower or faster metabolism and musculoskeletal structure and dimensions, nor the consequences and implications of malnourishment, and unhealthy eating and lifestyle habits, has determined, and educated the public accordingly, that the ideal body image is supposed to be very slim, sometimes even questionably close to anorexic.  This has led millions of people, primarily women, to become very concerned about, if not even obsessed with the way they look and led them to attempt and match as close as they can an ideal figure that for the majority of us would simply be an unrealistic expectation.  It goes without saying, however, that feeling right and at peace with and within our body image and size favorably impacts our self-esteem.  In fact, people who struggle with their body weight and self-image are usually under a much higher stress than the average person who doesn’t, for a number of reasons ranging from not looking as good as they suppose they should, to the fear of being criticized or even mocked by others due to their oversized physical appearances, especially if in their teen years when the need to feel accepted by the group is, usually, at its climax.  All these issues may worsen the situation for many people who became overweight or even obese due to emotional, excessive eating, and contribute to the problem to a much greater extent, trapping them in a catch-22, which in many cases appears as impossible to escape from.  
  
            Though the previously mentioned PBS documentary was pretty inspirational in revealing its approach to beauty from different cultural perspectives and in examining the dimensions of the human body strictly from an aesthetic point of view, all of which contributes to better understand socio-cultural aspects, when we, however, consider obesity from a medical perspective and analyze its impact on human health, we may end up with a completely different evaluation and conclusion.  In fact, as Jeremy Kaslow, MD – a Board Certified Internal Medicine Physician and Surgeon who has been practicing for more than twenty five years in Orange County, California – correctly stated when referring to diet and self image, while losing weight “at any price” in order to “fit into a particular dress or feel comfortable in a swimsuit, is about image…” weight management, to the contrary, is related to “the pursuit of lifelong health.” (Trivieri, L. & Anderson, J. W., 2002, p. 826)

Obesity: What it is and what causes it

            A recent article titled “A.M.A. Recognizes Obesity as a Disease”, and published online by The New York Times, attempted to make a summary of the main issues that obesity brings with it.  Interestingly enough, the article stated that “the question of whether obesity is a disease or not is a semantic one, since there is not even a universally agreed upon definition of what constitutes a disease… .”  (Retrieved July 1st, 2013 from http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/business/ama-recognizes-obesity-as-a-disease.html?_r=0)

            As a matter of fact, navigate among the various schools of thought in the attempt to determine what a proper definition of health and disease might be would take much time and endless efforts and lead us astray from our current discussion, at least for now.  Huge is, in fact, the difference between mainstream medicine – which is fundamentally based only on what is physically provable through clinical analysis – and the holistic approach of alternative/complementary medicine, which, by taking into account the complexity of human life and, consequently, of health from a physical, spiritual and emotional perspective includes also all the invisible and, from the conventional medical point of view, ‘improvable’ aspects all of which, nonetheless, still contribute to our health and well-being.  That said, we are going to examine right away what obesity is and how and when a person is classified as obese.        

            The Free Online Medical Dictionary defines obesity as “an abnormal accumulation of body fat, usually 20 percent or more over an individual’s ideal body weight” and distinguishes as mild obesity being between 20 to 40% over one’s ideal body weight; as moderate obesity being between 40 to 100% overweight; and as severe or morbid obesity being 100% over one’s ideal weight.  The body mass index (BMI) is considered to be the unit of measurement to calculate whether a person should be classified as obese, with BMI of 25.9-29 indicating being overweight and BMI over 30 the state of obesity. (Retrieved July 10, 2013 from http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/obesity)

            Despite their differences on what may constitute health and disease and how to deal with them, today both mainstream and alternative medicine seem to agree that the two main factors which cause a person to become overweight or even obese are an incorrect, imbalanced diet and unhealthy lifestyle habits.  Genetic hereditary factors, in fact, though may in some cases increase the chances to have to struggle with weight management and loss, do not necessarily determine the final result, for, as a matter of fact, predisposition does not mean that people are condemned to succumb and become fat, but only that they might be more inclined than others to accumulate weight if they do not pay extra attention and educate themselves about what foods to eat, in what quantity and combination, and stay away from conducting a sedentary lifestyle.

            Leaving aside the aesthetic factor previously mentioned, obesity is a serious condition which has proven to lead to a great variety of health issues including “degenerative diseases, heart problems, certain cancers, diabetes, arthritis and more… .” Furthermore “high blood pressure, varicose veins, kidney problems, infertility, gallstones, and liver disease” (Balch J. F. & Stengler M., 2004, p. 390) also have a higher probability to occur if the individual is overweight.  Had not been that enough, the consequence of obesity, which is in fact a highly toxic state, is a depressed immune system, which makes people overweight more prone than others to become sick for all sorts of reasons.  But why can we define obesity as a highly toxic state?   What originates obesity?  And is obesity more spread in some countries rather than in others?  The following subtitle will try to answer these questions.

Our modern, industrialized world and obesity

            Though some people born and raised in our developed Western countries might not know or even have hard time to believe it, over the centuries there have been several civilizations – such as the Okinawa in Japan, the Hunzas, who were discovered only around the 1920s by the British Army and the Karakorum, who both lived in the Himalayan-northeastern Pakistan region; the Russian Georgians, Abkasian and Ajerbaijanis; the Titicacas and Vilcabambans in South America; and the Hopis, Thlinglets and Labradors in North America (Day, 2007, pp. 8-12) – who have become famous for their amazing health and longevity, with many of them reaching 120 years and more and looking half of their age, being still fit and conducting plenty of physical activities, sports included.  Among these people health issues so widely spread in our Western world, such as obesity, stroke, diabetes and cancer, to name a few, were completely unknown.  Some common features, which emerged from the reports made by the Western observers who got in touch with and lived among them, were identified with a healthy diet primarily based on vegetables, fruits, grain, a pretty low consume of animal proteins, a quite active lifestyle through physical labor and sports and/or games, and a strong sense of family and community relationships.  The kind of nutrition these civilizations used has also characterized for millennia other Asian populations whose diet highly reflects the teaching and philosophy of the two main Eastern medical systems, that is the Indian Ayurveda and TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) both of which encourage the use of whole foods and vegetables and discourage the high consume of animal proteins.

            If we look today at the state of health of the worldwide population we might reach the conclusion that obesity is primarily and widely spread in the most industrialized countries and in those on their way to become as such,  or – simply stated – that is the result of wealth and abundance.  As a matter of fact, people living in third world countries, especially those in the countryside who sustain themselves with a more vegetarian, when not even complete vegan diet and conduct a simple, yet quite active existence are almost never overweight, let alone obese.

            The result of our industrialized world and its impact on people’s diet and sedentary lifestyle, both of which contribute to the epidemic of obesity and other degenerative diseases which follow it, are under our very eyes.  According to the information Phillip Day provided in his book Health Wars  (2007), there were “one in five people in the UK” considered “medically obese” by the British government’s National Audit Office (NAO) in 2001, while the number of people overweight had tripled during the last 20 years, leading to some 58% of the British population being classified as overweight, this causing “more than 30,000 premature deaths in the UK in 1998” and some “£ 2.6 billion in treatment.” (p. 55)

            The UK data, however, were not very different from those of the U.S. that author Patrick Holford mentioned in his work The New Optimum Nutrition Bible, with the U.S. sadly detaining the worldwide obesity record with its 60% of Americans being overweight, 30% being obese, and the numbers still on the rise.  The same source also stressed how obesity increases “the risk for diabetes by seventy-seven times” and with it the chance of “heart disease by eight times”, along with costing the US $117 billions and claiming some 400,000 lives per year. (2004, p. 316).

            Furthermore, though till some 15-20 years ago it was almost impossible to see an Asian person being overweight or obese, the Globalization and the export of our Western world with its quite unhealthy typical American diet to those countries have seriously compromised their balanced dietary habits.  In his article China’s alarming increase in obesity blamed on more affluent lifestyle, published on The Guardian on August 18, 2006, science correspondent James Randerson denounced the “alarming” rate at which obesity has been increasing in China during those last several years, “with nearly 15% of the population overweight and a 28-fold increase in the problem in children in 15 years” as the British Medical Journal reported.  According to his article the reasons for all this were a much higher consume of meat and an increase in sedentary lifestyle.  Obesity, and along with it diabetes and heart disease, started rising at an epidemic level in this ancient civilization where for millennia such health related issues were very rare, when not even completely unknown.  Professor Yangfeng Wu – Director of The George Institute, China, Executive Associate Director at the University Clinical Research Institute in Peking, Honorary Professor at The Georgia Institute for Global Health, Sidney Medical SchoolAustralia, and also a member of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in Beijing – who is responsible for the country’s obesity control program admitted that according to the China’s 2002 statistics there were already 14.5% of Chinese, that is 184 million people, overweight and 2.6%, or 31 millions, already obese.  The most dramatic aspect emerging from these data was, consequently, the rate at which overweight and obesity were growing, that is “28 times between 1985 and 2000 in children aged seven to 18”, this leading “one fifth of the overweight or obese people in the world” to be Chinese.  As Professor Barnett, Head of the diabetes and obesity group at Birmingham Universitysynthesized “westernization” and “urbanization” had been contributing to the striking change in diet and lifestyle determining the epidemic of obesity and other related degenerative diseases.  As a result, the Chinese millennial civilization, whose diet was mainly based on rice and vegetables, now sees the “excess body fat…[as] …health and prosperity” – as Professor Wu put it. (2006) (Retrieved July 18, 2013 from http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2006/aug/18/china.mainsection).   Had not been obesity enough, as Janet Larsen reported in her Earth Policy Institute ReleasePlan B Update May 25, 2011 “cancer is now the leading cause of death in China” claiming, according to the Chinese Ministry of Health, almost a quarter of all deaths in the nation. (Retrieved July 18, 2013 from www.earth-policy.org/plan_b_updates/2011/update96)
           
            These data seem to confirm our previous statement that obesity is the result of wealth and abundance.  However, though obesity is, in fact, related to more food consumption, so often unfortunately encouraged by the ‘all you can eat’ advertising policy amply spread in our western world, USA in primis, the reality is more complex than that.  When we do not feed our body with all the nutrients it needs to stay healthy and in balance, our body keeps asking for more food till it feels satisfied.  Processed and refined foods, which have been deprived from most of their nutrients through their respective industrialized processes, play a specific role: they make the products look white, a color that according to market analysis renders them more appealing to the public and, consequently, leads to more sales and higher profits.  These processes, however, strongly contribute to the productions of foods which have from very low to no nutritional value at all.  These factors explain the need for most people who consume simple, white carbohydrates to increase their intake over time in order to satisfy the need for the nutrients their bodies so desperately have been longing for and deprived of. 

            The first consequence of these kinds of low to no nutritional value foods is a state of high minerals deficiency which leads to degenerative diseases.  An example of fundamental food considered by both the already mentioned Ayurveda, which is the oldest medical system we know of, dating back to some 5,000 years, and TMC as a mean “to strengthen the body and nurture the mind and the heart” is the wheat berry which, by undergoing “the industrialized production methods” of refinement and processing “is stripped of its essential values” (Pitchford, 2002, p. 8) and, consequently, loses all its historical efficacy. 

            Among the major deficiencies caused by the use of refined foods are those related to selenium and magnesium.  Deficiency in selenium leads to hypothyroidism, also called low thyroid, a problem affecting in the US five times more women than men.  Furthermore, obesity and hypothyroidism are strictly connected to each other due to the fact that since selenium impacts “the transmission of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine” (T3), which facilitates the absorption of nutrients, its deficiency slows this process and leads to overweight or even to obesity.  An insufficient quantity of selenium intake also allows for the accumulation of heavy metals due to the fact that selenium bounds up with them counteracting their toxicity as well as the activity of different kinds of viruses, HIV included.  To the contrary, a balanced diet containing a sufficient quantity of selenium prevents “premature aging, heart disease, arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.” (Pitchford, 2002, pp. 8, 9)

            Deficiency in magnesium, also caused by high consume of refined food,  characterizes almost “70% of the United States population” and according to TCM, is responsible for “stagnation, erratic changes in the body, emotions, or mind” and highlights the “liver/gallbladder imbalance.” On the other hand, the highly beneficial and even healing properties of magnesium can prevent and/or counteract “irritability, depression, bipolar disorder, sleep disorder, and PMS (premenstrual syndrome):…migraine, sudden infant death syndrome, cramps, and spasm anywhere in the body…, constipation and the fast-cycling blood sugar imbalance in alcoholism and diabetes.” (p. 9)
           
            Though this may surprise someone, people living in underdeveloped countries whose diet is plant based and, consequently, consume a higher quantity of legumes – like beans, soy, peas, lentils, chickpeas and many others – along with whole grains and seeds, do not suffer from magnesium deficiency due to the fact that plants are much richer of this nutrient than animal proteins are.  To the contrary, magnesium deficiency is among the main aspects characterizing the poor quality of the average American’s diet which, by consisting primarily of high-fat, low-fiber, refined junk foods, including white flour processed meat, fat sugar, alcohol, canned and processed foods, preservatives, and toxins not only causes malnourishment but, by not including the necessary amount of fibers the body needs daily to prevent and eliminate the accumulation of toxins, precludes the maintenance of a healthy colon and compromises the immune system to an even greater extent.  The result of this is autointoxication, that is, a serious state of self-poisoning generated within the body and caused by toxic substances, such as microorganisms, parasites or pathogen flora, metabolic wastes and other toxins ingested through either foods or the use of chemicals for both our personal care and other cleaning activities.

            Another important aspect which contributes to obesity is the high amount of sugar consumed and its poor quality.  The term sugar embraces a wide umbrella of different kinds of products running from dextrose, originated from starches, to fructose, contained in fruits, to lactose, from milk, to maltose, from malt, to sucrose, which is the refined product derived from cane and beet which people generally use in their tea, coffee, cakes and is contained in soft drinks, and from which its “salts, fibers, enzymes, proteins, vitamins, and minerals have been removed”. (Day, 2007, p. 98)

            Alarming is also the fact that the sugar-sweetened foods that people usually buy and consume have reached some 8.68 million tons of sugar each year, which equal to 73 pounds per person per year and represent the 25 percent of total calories consumed only in the US versus the no more than 10 percent that the WHO (World Health Organization) suggests to use per person. (Holford, 2004, p. 44)  Besides, according to the NCHS (National Center for Health Statistics) Data Brief published by the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) on May 2013 under the title Consumption of Added Sugars Among U.S. Adults, 2005-2010 non-Hispanic black men and women consumed a larger percentage of their total calories from added sugars than non-Hispanic white and Mexican-American men and women with an increased consumption of added sugars, which included sweeteners added to processed and prepared foods, being linked to a decrease in intake of essential micronutrients [1, 2] and an increase in body weight [3]. Though according to this source the statistic showed that the majority of added sugars was obtained from foods rather than beverages, the article pointed out that previous research has proven that when foods and beverages are separated into specific food and beverage items regular sodas are the leading food source of added sugar, at least for adults aged 18-54 [6], with one-third of calories from added sugars being consumed among adults, 40% of calories from added sugars consumed among children and adolescents as beverages [5] and regardless of whether the added sugars are from food or beverages, the majority of the calories from added sugars as well as total calories are consumed at home by both adults and youth. (Retrieved July 29, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db122.htm)

            Sugar is fundamental to our lives for by burning it converts itself into the energy our body needs to function properly.  Its activity and main purpose very much resemble the one that the oil (petrol or gasoline) provides to our vehicle: it makes the engine run and enables people to drive where they need to.  However, while a moderate amount of natural sugar is needed for a correct intake of energy, an excess quantity of refined sugar is highly detrimental to our health for it “passes quickly into the bloodstream in large amount, giving the stomach and pancreas a shock.” (Pitchford, 2002, p. 189)  This produces an acid condition that negatively impacts our body through the loss of minerals and calcium, with the latter causing bone problems, and a weakened digestive system that does not allow the food to be effectively digested.  Blood sugar imbalance and craving for more sugar are the results of this process. 

            However, it’s important to keep in mind that more than the amount of calories intake per se, the real issue when we talk about obesity relates to our metabolism, that is the ability of and speed with which our body transforms the food we eat into fat and keeps our blood sugar level even.  Once our body can no longer keep our blood sugar level even, a state of imbalance, that is of insulin resistance occurs.  In this case the blood sugar level undergoes a real rollercoaster: when it’s too high, it turns sugar into fat; when it’s too low, the body lacks the energy it needs to perform efficiently and the person feels lethargic.  During these ups and downs, when the blood sugar level is high the body produces insulin, through which the sugar transitions from the blood into the cells and converts any excess sugar into fat.  As consequence, the higher the blood sugar level, the more insulin is produced, and the more insulin is produced the more sugar is transformed into fat till the body’s cells become less responsive, that is insulin resistant, this increasing the production of insulin to an even greater extent.  Eventually, when the cells become completely unresponsive, diabetes appears. (Holford, 2004, pp. 316, 317)

Obesity as Disease: What to do next

            In 1948 WHO (World Health Organization) defined health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”  In so doing, and despite the strong impact that our Western, Newtonian materialistic concept of medicine might have exercised, through this definition WHO proved to have taken into account the invisible, intangible, and sometimes improvable factors – being emotions, beliefs, and psyche – all of which also contribute to health, or the lack of it, as Ayurveda, TMC, and Homeopathy have recognized through the centuries thanks to their holistic approach to life and health. 

            While referring to the definition of disease according to TCM, Dr. Andrew Weil explained in his work Guide To Optimum Health that a physical illness is the consequence of a non-material one, that is, the result of energy imbalance or blockage, which if not liberated and allowed to freely flow within and without the body, materializes itself in the form of physical illness. (Weil, 2002, CD 1).  That said, and considering all the devastating consequences that obesity brings with it, we cannot but agree with the American Medical Association and its recent admission that obesity is, in fact, a disease.  In so doing, we may be glad to see that not only obesity has been in the end correctly classified, but also to realize that the gap between mainstream and alternative medicine has become a little thinner this making them closer to each other at least on this important aspect of human health.    

            During those last thirty years and in the attempt to fight obesity, we have been assisting to the raise and fall of hundreds of weight loss diets and programs – from low-carbohydrate to low-fat and low-sugar – each one claiming to have the capacity to enable people to lose weight, in some cases almost ‘in the blink of an eye’.  Although a few people might have reached that goal, the truth is that in the majority of the cases all these programs seem to have miserably failed.  The main reason determining their failure has been a simple one: no matter how trendy they were, those programs did not take into account the individual’s specific needs in terms of nutrition and led to a state of imbalance and, consequently, to a positive result in terms of weight loss only in the short run and for few of them. As consequence, in the attempt to recover from their long time deprivation, once the weight loss diet ended in order to satisfy their body’s needs they went back to their old eating and lifestyle habits.  In so doing, hundreds of thousands of people, if not millions, not only regained their previous weight, but they ended up weighing even more than they did at the time they started the program.

            In conclusion, now that we have finally agreed that obesity is, in fact, a disease and should be treated as such, our main focus as individuals, community and nation should be working together in terms of education and prevention.  “Prevent is better than cure” the old saying goes.  Though this is true, prevention, however, cannot occur without a proper education about healthy eating and lifestyle habits.  All of this should start at a very young age, when we are in preschool, in order to educate both children and their families about foods properties, everyday nutritional requirements, and balanced lifestyle and proper exercise.  As a matter of fact, becoming aware of the proper way to eat while still enjoying the greatest variety of foods and the nutrients our body needs on a regular basis is absolutely paramount to our health.  No need to say that being active, doing some sort of regular physical exercise beginning with walking each and every single day while avoiding a lazy attitude which is the cause of a detrimental sedentary lifestyle that hurts us by preventing our body to burn the calories in excess and contributes, in the long run, not only to obesity but, as we have considered so far, to an endless number of health issues including degenerative disease, is the correct way to go.

            In the end, therefore, education and prevention are absolutely a must, though the real challenge for many people might be taking responsibility for their own life and, consequently, their health.  This is only possible, however, through the joint effort of will, determination and awareness about what to do next starting with stopping old ways of thinking and justifying bad habits which have led so many individuals in particular, and our nation in general, to detain the unfortunate worldwide record as for the number of obese people and diseases related and caused by obesity, resetting their minds in order to understand and accept the reality of the matter, that is, that obesity is not a merely aesthetic issue but a real disease which can and should be avoided and whose final manifestation is usually not the result of an adverse fate, but rather of our unhealthy choices and behaviors. 

Maria Teresa De Donato©2013-2016. All Rights Reserved.

Photo: Paolo Trotta©2013-2016. All Rights Reserved.

                                                            References


Balch, J. F. & Stengler, M. (2004). Prescription for NATURAL CURES. Obesity.
           
            (p. 390). Haboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc

Centers for Disease and Prevention (2013). Publications and Information Products.

            NCHS Data brief. Number 122, May 2013. Consumption of Added Sugars

            Among U.S. Adults, 2005-2010. (Author: R. Bethene Ervin & Cynthia L. Ogden).

            Retrieved July 29, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db122.htm
1.                    Marriott BP, Olsho L, Hadden L, Conner P. Intake of added sugars and selected nutrients in the United States, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2006. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 50(3):228–58. 2010.
2.                    Bowman SA. Diets of individuals based on energy intakes from added sugars. Family Economics and Nutrition Review. 12(2):31–8. 1999.
3.                    Vartanian LR, Schwartz MB, Brownell KD. Effects of soft drink consumption on nutrition and health: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Public Health 97:667–75. 2007.
5.                    Ervin RB, Kit BK, Carroll MD, Ogden CL. Consumption of added sugar among U.S. children and adolescents, 2005–2008. NCHS data brief, no 87. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2012.
6.                    Welsh JA, Sharma AJ, Grellinger L, Vos MB. Consumption of added sugars is decreasing in the United States. Am J Clin Nutr 94(3):726–34. 2011.

Day, P. (2007). Health Wars. The Hunzas (pp. 8-11). The Georgians (p. 11). The

            Karakorum (p. 11). The Abkasians and Ajerbaijanis (p. 12). War #4: Lifestyle

            (p. 55). War #7: Sugar – The White, the Pink and the Blue. Sucrose (The White).

            (p. 98). Tonbridge Kent, UK: Credence Publications

Earth Policy Insitute (2011). Release – Plan B Update May 25, 2011. (Author: Janet

            Larsen). Retrieved July 18, 2013 from


Holford, P. (2004). The New OPTIMUM NUTRTION Bible. (Second Edition).

            Chapter 7: The Myth of the Well-Balanced Diet (p. 44). Chapter 36: Breaking the

            Fat Barrier (pp. 316, 317). New York, NY: Crossing Press/Random House, Inc.

Pitchford, P. (2002). Healing with Whole Foods – Asian Tradition and Modern Nutrition

            (Third Edition). Section 1: Whole Foods. The Incalculable Value of Unrefined

            Plant Foods: Mineral Deficiencies in the Land of Excess (pp. 8, 9). Chapter 11:

            Sweeteners. The Misuse of Sugar (p. 189). Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books

The Free Online Medical Dictionary (2013).  Obesity. Retrieved July 10, 2013 from


The Guardian (2006). China’s alarming increase in obesity blamed on more afferent

            lifestyle (Author: James Randerson. Published August 17, 2006). Retrieved July


The New York Times (2013). A.M.A. Recognizes Obesity as a Disease. (Author:

            Andrew Pollack – Published June 18, 2013). Retrieved July 1st, 2013 from
           

Trivieri, L. & Anderson, J. W. (2002). Alternative Medicine – The Definitive Guide
           

Obesità: Dall’Estetismo alla Malattia


Dott.ssa Maria Teresa De Donato, 

Naturopata Tradizionale, Consulente Nutrizione ed Erbalismo, Omeopata



L’obesità dal punto di vista estetico, culturale e psicologico

Per molto tempo il mondo occidentale ha identificato l’obesità prevalentemente come problema estetico.  Fu alquanto sorprendente, quindi, anni fa guardare un documentario trasmesso da PBS (Public Broadcasting Service – corrispondente alla RAI italiana) che, nel considerare il concetto di bellezza femminile, menzionava come quest’ultima venisse percepita in maniera diversa, e conseguentemente definita, a seconda della cultura e dell’etnia.  Uno degli aspetti principali che emerse dal video fu la considerazione che vedere la bellezza quale sinonimo dell’essere magri è un fenomeno che caratterizza prevalentemente la nostra società occidentale bianca.  Secondo le informazioni che il documentario di PBS fu in grado di provvedere, gli americani di origine africana, e gli africani in linea generale, sono più inclini ad associare la bellezza con l’armonia delle forme che non con l’essere magri.  Questo significa, ad esempio, che a prescindere se una donna sia in sovrappeso o persino obesa – almeno entri certi limiti – finché ha le sue “giuste curve” ed è ben proporzionata, ossia punto-vita e fianchi sono chiaramente difiniti, ha ancora la possibilità di essere considerata bella, attraente.

Tuttavia, molti concorderanno sul fatto che il concetto di bellezza ha subito drastici cambiamenti nel corso del tempo.  Il risultato è stato che ciò che era considerato immagine ideale del corpo (femminile) e, di conseguenza, ideale di peso negli anni Cinquanta era già superato negli anni Settanta.  Durante questi ultimi quarant’anni, il mondo della moda, il cui scopo non è certamente quello di prendere in considerazione l’essere umano in quanto a velocità o lentezza del proprio metabolismo, né le dimensioni e la struttura muscolo-scheletriche, né le conseguenze ed implicazioni dovute a malnutrizione e ad abitudini e stili di vita non sani, ha determinato, ed in armonia con ciò istruito il pubblico in maniera consona, che l’ideale del corpo femminile debba essere necessariamente molto magro, a volte persino discutibilmente simile all’anoressico.  Questo ha indotto milioni di persone, soprattutto donne, a preoccuparsi molto, se non addirittura a divenire ossessionate, della loro apparenza portandole a fare di tutto per raggiungere quell’ideale di fisico che per la maggior parte di noi rappresenta semplicemente una mèta non realistica. 

È superfluo ribadire, comunque, come il sentirsi bene ed in pace con se stessi e la propria apparenza fisica con le proprie dimensioni impatti la nostra fiducia in noi stessi.  In effetti, le persone che hanno problemi con il proprio peso e la propria immagine esteriore, generalmente vanno incontro ad un maggiore livello di stress che non coloro che non ne hanno, per vari motivi che vanno dal non apparire fisicamente così come vorrebbero, o ritengono di dovere, al timore di essere criticati o persino derisi da altri a causa della loro mole abbondante o eccessiva, e questo, soprattutto se avviene negli anni dell’adolescenza quando il bisogno di sentirsi accettati dal gruppo raggiunge il suo apice.  Tutti questi problemi possono peggiorare la situazione di molte persone che sono diventate in sovrappeso, o persino obese, a causa di abitudini alimentari eccessive causate da ragioni di natura emotiva e contribuire ulteriormente al problema intrappolando l’individuo in un circolo vizioso cui può sembrare impossibile sottrarsi.

Sebbene il documentario di PBS citato in precedenza costituisse davvero un’ispirazione in quanto a rivelare vari approcci alla bellezza secondo diverse prospettive culturali, quando, tuttavia, consideriamo l’obesità da un punto di vista medico ed analizziamo il suo impatto sulla salute, possiamo approdare a valutazioni e conclusioni completamente diverse.  Infatti, come il Dr. Jeremy Kaslow – Medico Internista e Chirurgo che esercita la professione da venticinque anni nella contea Orange in California – ha correttamente ammesso riferendosi alla dieta e alla propria apparenze fisica, mentre il perdere peso “a qualunque costo” al fine di “indossare un particolare abito o sentirsi a proprio agio in un determinato costume da bagno ha a che vedere con la propria immagine esteriore…” il controllo o mantenimento del peso, al contrario, è da collegarsi al “conseguimento di una salute duratura” (Trivieri, L. & Anderson, J. W., 2002, p. 826)

L’obesità: Cos’è e quale ne è la causa

Un recente articolo intitolato L’A.M.A. Riconosce l’Obesità quale Malattia, e pubblicato online dal New York Times, ha cercato di riassumere i principali problemi che questa porta con sè.  Piuttosto interessante è il fatto che l’articolo dichiari che “domandarsi se l’obesità sia una malattia o meno è una questione semantica in quanto non esiste alcuna definizione su cui tutti concordino su cosa costituisca la malattia…” (1 Luglio, 2013  -  http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/19/business/ama-recognizes-obesity-as-a-disease.html?_r=0)

Navigare, infatti, tra le varie scuole di pensiero nel tentativo di determinare quale sia una definizione appropriata della malattia richiederebbe molto tempo e sforzo e ci porterebbe fuori strada rispetto all’argomento in oggetto, almeno al momento.  Grande è infatti, la differenza tra la corrente principale legata alla medicina allopatica (tradizionale) – fondamentalmente basata solo su ciò che può essere fisicamente dimostrabile attraverso le analisi cliniche – e l’approccio olistico della medicina alternativa (o complementare), il quale, prendendo in considerazione la complessità della vita umana e, di conseguenza, della salute da un punto di vista non solo fisico, ma anche e soprattutto spirituale, emotivo e mentale include anche tutto ciò che la medicina convenzionale considera non dimostrabile, proprio perché invisibile, ma che malgrado ciò contribuisce alla nostra salute e al nostro benessere.  Ciò premesso, esamineremo ora cosa esattamente sia l’obesità e come e quando una persona possa o debba essere classificata obesa.

Il Free Online Medical Dictionary definisce l’obesità quale “accumulo anormale di grasso, generalmente nella quantità del 20% in eccesso rispetto al peso corporeo ideale” e distingue una obesità lieve l’eccesso oscillante tra il 20 ed il 40% del proprio peso; obesità moderata, quando l’eccesso è tra il 40 ed il 100% del proprio peso; e grave quando l’eccesso supera il 100%.  L’indice della massa corporea (Body Mass Index or BMI) è considerato l’unità di misura per calcolare se una persona debba essere classificata obesa o no, con un BMI compreso tra 25.9 e 29 che indichi l’essere in sovrappeso ed un BMI superiore a 30 che conclami lo stato di obesità. (10 Luglio, 2013 - http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/obesity)

Malgrado le differenze su ciò che possa costituire salute e malattia e su come affrontarle, oggi sia la medicina convenzionale che quella alternativa sembrano concordare sul fatto che i due elementi principali che inducono una persona a diventare in sovrappeso o addirittura obesa sono un’alimentazione scorretta e non equilibrata ed uno stile di vita non sano.  Fattori genetici ereditari, infatti, benché in alcuni casi possano aumentare le probabilità nell’avere problemi in quanto a mantenimento o perdita di peso, non determinano necessariamente il risultato finale.  L’essere predisposti non implica, infatti, l’essere condannati ad ingrassare, ma solo che si è più portati di altri ad accumulare peso SE non si fa attenzione e non ci si informa su quali cibi mangiare, come combinarli tra loro, e SE non si evita di condurre una vita prevalentemente sedentaria.

Escludendo il fattore estetico menzionato in precedenza, l’obesità è una condizione seria che ha dimostrato di condurre ad una grande varietà di problemi di salute che include “malattie degenerative, problemi cardiaci, alcune tipologie di cancro, diabete, artrite e molte altre.”  Inoltre “ipertensione, vene varicose, problemi renali, infertilità, calcoli biliari, e malattie al fegato (Balch J. F. & Stengler M., 2004, p. 390) hanno più probabilità a manifestarsi se si è in sovrappeso.  Se ciò non fosse sufficiente, la conseguenza dell’obesità, che consiste in effetti in uno stato di elevata tossicità, è un sistema immunologico depresso e che rende la persona in sovrappeso più incline di altre ad ammalarsi per ogni sorta di ragioni.  Ma perché l’obesità può essere definita uno stato altamente tossico?  Cos’è che dà origine all’obesità?  Inoltre, è l’obesità più diffusa in alcuni paesi piuttosto che in altri?  Il seguente sottotitolo risponderà a queste domande.

Il nostro mondo moderno ed industrializzato e l’obesità.   

Malgrado alcune persone nate e cresciute nelle nazioni occidentali sviluppate possano ignorarlo o persino avere difficoltà a credervi, nel corso dei secoli ci sono state molteplici civiltà – quali ad esempio gli Okinawa in Giappone, gli Hunzas, che furono scoperti solo agli inizi degli anni Venti dall’esercito britannico, ed i Karakorum, che vissero entrambi nella regione pakistana nordorientale dell’Himalaya; i russi Georgiani, Ablasiani e Azerbaijani; i Titicaca e i Vilcabamba dell’America del Sud; gli Hopi, i Thinglet e i Labrador del nord America (Day, 2007, pp. 8-12) – che sono passati alla storia per la loro incredibile salute e longevità con alcuni di loro che hanno raggiunto e persino superato i 120 anni dimostrando la metà della loro età, mantenendosi in forma e conducendo un’ampia gamma di attività fisiche, sport inclusi, sino alla loro morte.  Tra questi popoli problemi di salute così diffusi nel nostro mondo occidentale, tra cui obesità, infarto, diabete e cancro, per menzionarne solo alcuni, erano del tutto sconosciuti e, se furono conosciuti, ciò avvenne solo dopo che queste popolazioni entrarono in contatto con gli occidentali ed abbandonarono le loro sane abitudini alimentari e di stile di vita.  Alcuni aspetti comuni a questi popoli, e che sono emersi dai rapporti fatti dagli osservatori occidentali che entrarono in contatto con loro e vissero tra loro, furono identificati in una sana dieta prevalentemente vegetariana basata sul consumo di verdure, frutta, grani, un ridotto uso di proteine animali, uno stile di vita piuttosto attivo attraverso lavoro fisico e sport e/o giochi, e relazioni familiari e di comunità molto strette.  Il tipo di alimentazione che queste civiltà utilizzarono ha caratterizzato per millenni altre popolazioni dell’Asia la cui dieta riflette gli insegnamenti e la filosofia dei due principali sistemi medici oggi in esistenza, ossia l’Ayurveda e la Medicina Tradizionale Cinese (TMC), le quali incoraggiano entrambe l’uso di alimenti integrali e di verdure e scoraggiano l’elevato consumo di  proteine animali.

Se oggi osserviamo lo stato di salute della popolazione mondiale, potremmo giungere alla conclusione che l’obesità sia soprattutto estesa nei paesi industrializzati e in quelli che lo stanno diventando, o – detto in maniera semplice – che sia il risultato di agiatezza economica e di abbondanza.  Infatti, gli abitanti dei paesi del Terzo Mondo, specialmente coloro che vivono nelle campagne, si cibano di una dieta vegetariana, quando non addirittura vegana, e conducono una vita semplice benché piuttosto attiva da un punto di vista fisico, raramente sono in sovrappeso e tantomeno obesi.  Il risultato del mondo industrializzato ed il suo impatto sulla dieta e sullo stile di vita sedentario di un popolo, entrambi elementi che contribuiscono all’epidemia di altre malattie degenerative che li seguono, sono visibili sotto i nostri stessi occhi.  Secondo le informazioni che Phillip Day ha provveduto tramite il suo libro Health Wars (Guerre per la Salute) (2007), nel 2001 “una persona su cinque nel Regno Unito” era considerata “clinicamente obesa” dal National Audit Office del governo Britannico mentre il numero delle persone in sovrappeso era triplicato negli ultimi 20 anni, con il risultato che circa il 58% della popolazione Britannica era classificata in sovrappeso; ciò aveva portato a “più di 30.000 morti premature nel Regno Unito nel 1998” e ad una spesa pari a “2.6 miliardi di sterline per i trattamenti.” (p. 55)

I dati del regno Unito, comunque, non si discostavano molto da quelli degli USA che l’autore Patrick Holford ha menzionato nella sua opera The New Optimum Nutritional Bible con gli USA tristemente detentori del primato mondiale di obesità con il 60% degli americani in sovrappeso, il 30% degli obesi, ed il numero in continua crescita.  La stessa fonte ha evidenziato anche come l’obesità aumentasse “il rischio di diabete di 77 volte” e, con esso, la possibilità di “malattie cardiache di 8 volte”, oltre a costare agli USA $117 miliardi di dollari e a reclamare la vita di circa 400.000 persone ogni anno. (2004, p. 316)  Inoltre, benché fino a circa 15-20 anni fa fosse quasi impossibile vedere un asiatico in sovrappeso o obeso, la globalizzazione e l’esportazione del nostro mondo occidentale, con la sua dieta americana piuttosto malsana, in altri paesi hanno seriamente compromesso le loro equilibrate abitudini alimentari.  Nel suo articolo China’s alarming increase in obesity blamed on more affluent lifestyle (Uno stile di vita più ricco è il responsabile dell’allarmante aumento di obesità in Cina), pubblicato su The Guardian l’8 agosto 2006, il corrispondente scientifico James Randerson ha denunciato “l’allarmante” tasso di crescita in Cina durante questi ultimi anni, “con quasi il 15% della popolazione in sovrappeso ed un aumento di 28 volte del problema nei bambini negli ultimi 15 anni” come il British Medical Journal ha riportato.  Secondo il suo articolo, i motivi di tutto ciò erano da identificarsi in un consumo molto più elevato di carni e nell’aumento di uno stile di vita sedentario.  Obesità, ed insieme ad essa, diabete e malattie cardiache, avevano iniziato l’ascesa raggiungendo un livello epidemico in questa antica civiltà dove per millenni tali malattie erano state estremamente rare.  Il Professor Yangfeng Wu – Direttore del George Institute, Cina, Direttore Esecutivo Associato c/o l’Istituto di Ricerca clinica dell’Università di Pechino, Professore Onorario c/o il Georgia Institute for Global Health della facoltà di Medicina dell’Università di Sidney, Australia, ed anche membro dell’Accademia cinese di Scienze Mediche a Pechino – che è responsabile del programma per il controllo dell’obesità del paese, ha ammesso che secondo le statistiche cinesi del 2002 il 14.5% dei cinesi, equivalente a 184 milioni di persone, era in sovrappeso ed il 2.6%, ossia circa 31 milioni, già obeso.  L’aspetto più drammatico che emergeva da questi dati era, quindi, il tasso a cui sovrappeso ed obesità stavano aumentando, cioè “di 28 volte tra il 1985 ed il 2000 nei giovani di età compresa tra i 7 ed i 18 anni”, il che significava che “un quinto della popolazione mondiale in sovrappeso o obesa” era cinese.  Come ha riassunto il Professor Barnett, Responsabile del gruppo di studio sul diabete e sull’obesità dell’Università di Birmingham, “occidentalizzazione” e “urbanizzazione” avevano contribuito allo sconvolgente cambiamento nell’alimentazione e nello stile di vita determinando l’epidemia di obesità e di altre malattie degenerative ad essa correlate.  Il risultato era stato che una civiltà millenaria come quella cinese, la cui dieta tradizionale era composta prevalentemente da riso e verdure, ora vede “l’eccesso di grasso nel corpo quali [sinonimi di] salute e prosperità” – come il Professor Wu afferma. (2006) (18 Luglio, 2013 –

E come se l’obesità non fosse abbastanza, come Janet Larsen ha riportato nel comunicato dell’Earth Policy Insitute – Plan B Aggiornamento del 25 Maggio 2011, “il cancro è ora la ragione principale di morte in Cina” e causa, secondo il Ministero della Salute Cinese, di circa un quarto delle morti nella nazione. (18 Luglio, 2013 – www.earth-policy.org/plan_b_updates/2011/update96)

Questi dati sembrano confermare la nostra precedente affermazione che l’obesità sia il risultato di prosperità economica e di abbondanza.  Tuttavia, benché essa sia in effetti correlata ad un maggior consumo di cibo, così spesso sfortunatamente incoraggiato dalle politiche commerciali del “all you can eat” (mangia tutto ciò che puoi) così diffuse nel mondo occidentale ad iniziare proprio dagli USA, la realtà è molto più complessa. Quando noi non alimentiamo il nostro corpo provvedendogli tutte le sostanze nutritive di cui ha bisogno per mantenersi in salute ed equilibrio, il nostro corpo continua a chiedere sempre più cibo fin quando si sente appagato.  Cibi processati e raffinati, che sono stati privati della maggior parte delle loro sostanze nutritive attraverso i rispettivi processi industriali, rivestono un ruolo particolare: questi trattamenti consentono ai prodotti di apparire bianchi, colore che, secondo le indagini di mercato, li rende più appetibili al pubblico e, conseguentemente, porta ad un numero maggiore di vendite e a profitti più elevati.  Questi processi di raffinazione, tuttavia, contribuiscono fortemente alla produzione di cibi dal valore nutritivo molto basso o totalmente assente.  Tali fattori spiegano il bisogno di molta gente che usa carboidrati bianchi semplici ad aumentarne nel tempo il consumo al fine di soddisfare la carenza di sostanze nutritive di cui il corpo avverte il disperato bisogno e di cui è stato così a lungo privato.

La prima conseguenza di questi tipi di alimenti dal valore nutrizionale basso, quando non addirittura assente, è uno stato di elevata carenza di minerali che conduce a malattie degenerative.  Un esempio di cibo fondamentale considerato da entrambi i sistemi medici in precedenza menzionati – ossia l’Ayurveda, che è il più antico in senso assoluto e risale a circa 5000 anni fa, e la Medicina Tradizionale Cinese – quale strumento “per rafforzare il corpo e nutrire mente e cuore” è il chicco di grano che, venendo sottoposto “ai metodi di produzione industriale” di raffinazione e processamento “viene spogliato di tutti i suoi valori essenziali” (Pitchford, 2002, p. 8) e, di conseguenza, perde tutta la sua storica efficacia.

Tra le maggiori carenze causate dall’uso di prodotti raffinati, ci sono quelle legate al selenio e al magnesio.  La carenza di selenio porta all’ipotiroidismo, conosciuto anche come tiroide lenta, un problema che negli USA affligge cinque volte di più le donne che gli uomini.  Inoltre, obesità ed ipotiroidismo sono strettamente interconnessi in quanto, dal momento che il selenio impatta il passaggio da thyroxine (T4) a triiodothyronine (T3), che facilita l’assorbimento delle sostanze nutritive, la sua carenza rallenta questo processo portando al sovrappeso o addirittura all’obesità.  Un consumo insufficiente di selenio permette anche l’accumulo di materiali pesanti a causa del fatto che il selenio – quando, al contrario, è presente in misura adeguata – si lega ad essi combattendone la tossicità così come l’attività di diversi tipi di virus, incluso l’HIV.  Al contrario, una dieta equilibrata e contenente una quantità sufficiente di selenio previene “invecchiamento prematuro, malattie cardiache, artrite, e sclerosi multipla.” (Pitchford, 2002, pp. 8, 9)

La carenza di magnesio, anch’essa causata dall’elevato consumo di cibi raffinati, caratterizza quasi “il 70% della popolazione degli Stati Uniti” e, secondo la Medicina Tradizionale Cinese, è responsabile di “ristagno, improvvisi cambiamenti nel corpo, nelle emozioni e nella mente” ed evidenzia “lo squilibrio tra fegato e cistifellea”. Al contrario, le proprietà altamente benefiche e curative del magnesio possono prevenire e/o combattere “irritabilità, depressione, disturbo bipolare, problemi del sonno, e PMS (sindrome premestruale):…emicranie, sindrome di morte infantile improvvisa, crampi e spasmi in qualsiasi parte del corpo…., costipazione, e improvvisi squilibri di zucchero nel sangue nei casi di alcolismo e diabete.” (p. 9)

Benché ciò possa sorprendere qualcuno, coloro che vivono in paesi sottosviluppati e la cui dieta si basa prevalentemente su consumo di piante e, quindi, su una quantità più elevata di legumi – quali fagioli, soia, piselli, lenticchie, ceci e molti altri – insieme a grani integrali e semi, non soffrono di carenza di magnesio poiché le piante sono molto più ricche di questa sostanza nutritiva di quanto non lo siano le proteine animali.  Al contrario, la carenza di magnesio è tra gli aspetti che caratterizza la scarsa qualità della dieta dell’americano medio e che, consistendo prevalentemente di cibi poveri di valore nutritivo, limitate fibre alimentari e di molti grassi, inclusi carni processate, zuccheri grassi, alcool, prodotti in scatola e cibi processati, conservanti, e tossine non solo sono causa di malnutrizione, ma, non includendo il quantitativo necessario di fibre di cui il corpo necessita quotidianamente per prevenire ed eliminare l’accumulo di tossine, preclude il mantenimento della salute del colon e compromette ulteriormente il sistema immunitario.  Il risultato di tutto ciò è l’autointossicazione, ossia un serio stato di avvelenamento generato all’interno del corpo e causato da sostanze tossiche, quali microorganismi, parassiti e flora patogena, rifiuti metabolici ed altre tossine ingerite attraverso cibi o sostanze chimiche usate sia per l’igiene personale sia per altre attività di pulizia.

Un altro importante aspetto che contribuisce all’obesità è l’elevato quantitativo di zucchero consumato e la sua scarsa qualità.  Il termine zucchero racchiude un’ampia gamma di prodotti che vanno dal destrosio, derivante dagli amidi, al fruttosio, contenuto nella frutta, al lattosio, del latte, al maltosio, dal malto, al saccarosio, che è un prodotto raffinato derivante dalla canna e dalla barbabietola che la gente usa generalmente nel proprio tè, caffè, dolci ed è contenuto nelle bavende a base di soda, e da cui “Sali, fibre, enzimi, proteine, vitamine, e minerali sono stati rimossi.” (Day, 2007, p. 98)

Allarmante è anche il fatto che i cibi cui è stato aggiunto zucchero e che la gente acquista e consuma regolarmente hanno raggiunto circa gli 8.68 milioni di tonnellate ogni anno, il che equivale a 73 pounds (Kg. 33,11) a persona l’anno e rappresentano il 25% del totale delle calorie consumate solo negli USA rispetto al non più del 10% di uso a persona consigliato dall’Organizzazione Mondiale della Sanità (WHO) (Holford, 2004, p. 44).  Inoltre, secondo una sintensi dei dati del Centro Nazionale per le Statistiche sulla Salute (NCHS) pubblicata nel maggio 2013 dal Centro per la Prevenzione ed il Controllo delle Malattie (CDC) sotto il titolo Consumo di zuccheri aggiunti nella popolazione americana adulta, 2005-2010, uomini e donne di colore non ispanici consumavano una percentuale totale di calorie da zuccheri aggiunti superiore a quella dei bianchi e degli americani di origine messicana, sia uomini che donne, con un incremento di tale consumo che includeva dolcificanti aggiunti ai cibi processati e già preparati e collegati ad una diminuzione nell’assunzione di micronutrienti essenziali [1, 2] e un aumento del peso corporeo [3].  Benché secondo questa fonte la statistica mostrasse che la maggioranza di zuccheri aggiunti proveniva dai cibi piuttosto che dalle bevande, l’articolo evidenziava come precedenti ricerche avessero dimostrato che quando cibi e bevande vengono separate in articoli distinti le bevande contenenti soda rappresentano la fonte principale di aggiunta di zucchero, almeno degli adulti di età compresa tra i 18 ed i 54 anni [6], con un terzo delle calorie da aggiunta di zuccheri che viene consumato tra gli adulti, 40% delle calorie derivanti da zuccheri aggiunti consumati nelle bevande da bambini ed adolescenti [5] e prescindendo dal fatto che gli zuccheri aggiunti provenissero da cibi o bevande, la maggioranza delle calorie derivanti da zuccheri aggiunti così come il totale delle calorie consumate in casa sia da adulti che da ragazzi (29 Luglio, 2013 –

Lo zucchero è fondamentale alla nostra esistenza in quanto bruciando si trasforma in energia di cui il nostro corpo ha bisogno per funzionare in maniera corretta.  La sua principale utilità somiglia molto a quella che la benzina provvede alla nostra autovettura: bruciando essa permette al motore di funzionare consentendo al conducente di andare dove deve.  Tuttavia, mentre un uso moderato dello zucchero naturale è necessario per una corretta assunzione di energie, una quantità eccessiva di zucchero raffinato è altamente deleteria alla salute in quanto “s’immette velocemente nel circolo ematico [sangue] in quantità elevata provocando una sensazione di shock allo stomaco e al pancreas.” (Pitchford, 2002, p. 198).  Ciò produce una condizione acida che impatta negativamente il nostro corpo provocando la perdita di minerali e calcio, quest’ultimo causando problemi alle ossa, ed un indebolimento del sistema digestivo che non permette al cibo di essere digerito efficacemente.  Conseguenze di questo processo sono uno squilibrio di zuccheri nel sangue e la voglia (percepita) di ulteriore zucchero.

È importante, comunque, tenere in considerazione che più che il quantitativo di consumo di calorie in sé, il problema reale, quando si parla di obesità, è rappresentato dal nostro metabolismo, ossia dall’abilità e velocità con cui il nostro corpo trasforma in grasso il cibo che mangiamo e trattiene il livello di zucchero nel sangue in equilibrio.  Una volta che il nostro corpo non è più in grado di mantenere lo zucchero nel sangue in una situazione di equilibrio, uno stato di squilibrio, ossia di insulino-dipendenza, compare.  In questo caso il livello di zucchero nel sangue subisce un reale sconvolgimento: quando il livello è troppo alto, lo zucchero si transforma in grasso; quando è troppo basso, il corpo manca dell’energia sufficiente di cui ha bisogno per effettuare la propria attività in maniera efficiente e la persona si sente letargica.  Nel corso di questi alti e bassi, quando il livello di zucchero nel sangue è alto il corpo produce insulina attraverso cui lo zucchero passa dal sangue alle cellule e converte lo zucchero in eccesso di grasso.  Ne consegue che più è alto il livello di zucchero nel sangue, più insulina è prodotta, e più insulina è prodotta, maggiore è la quantità di zucchero che si trasforma in grasso finché le cellule del corpo rallentano la loro risposta, divenendo insulino-resistenti e causando una produzione di insulina ancora più elevata.  Alla fine, quando le cellule cessano completamente di rispondere a questo meccanismo, si manifesta il diabete. (Holford, 2004, pp. 316, 317)

L’obesità come malattia: Cosa fare dopo.

Nel 1948 l’Organizzazione Mondiale della Sanitá (WHO) definì la salute quale “stato di completo benessere fisico, mentale e sociale e non la semplice assenza di malattia o infermità.”  Così facendo, e malgrado il forte impatto che il concetto materialistico newtoniano occidentale della medicina potesse aver esercitato, attraverso tale definizione la WHO dimostrò di aver preso in considerazione tutti quei fattori invisibili, non tangibili, e a volte non dimostrabili – quali emozioni, convinzioni, e psyche – che pur contribuiscono alla salute, o alla mancanza di essa, come Ayurveda, Medicina Tradizional Cinese ed Omeopatia hanno riconosciuto nel corso dei secoli grazie al loro approccio olistico alla vita in generale e alla salute in particolare.

Nel fare riferimento alla definizione di malattia secondo TCM, il Dr. Andrew Weil ha spiegato nella sua opera Guida Alla Salute Ottimale che una malattia fisica è la conseguenza di una non-materiale, ossia il risultato di uno squilibrio o blocco energetico che se non viene liberato e messo nella condizione di scorrere liberamente all’interno e all’esterno del nostro corpo, si materializza assumendo la forma di malattia fisica (Weil, 2002, CD 1).  Detto ciò e considerando tutte le devastanti conseguenze che l’obesità porta con sé, non possiamo che concordare con l’Associazione Medica Americana e la sua recente ammissione che l’obesità è, in effetti, una malattia.  Nel far ciò, possiamo essere grati nel vedere che non solo l’obesità è stata finalmente classificata, ma anche nel realizzare che la distanza tra la corrente medica principale e la medicina alternativa si è assottigliata facendo avvicinare un po’ di più l’uno all’altro i due sistemi medici almeno su questo importante aspetto della salute umana.

Durante questi ultimi trent’anni, e nel tentativo di combattere l’obesità, abbiamo assistito alla comparsa e scomparsa di centinaia di diete e programmi per la perdita di peso – da quelle/i che limitavano il consumo di carboidrati a quelle/i che riducevano l’assunzione di grassi e zuccheri – ognuna/o delle/i quali sosteneva di essere in grado di consentire alla gente di dimagrire e, in alcuni casi, anche in tempi estremamente brevi. Benché un’esigua minoranza sia riuscita a raggiungere questa mèta, la verità è che, nella maggioranza dei casi, quasi tutti questi programmi sembrano aver miseramente fallito.  La ragione principale di tale fallimento è molto semplice: per quanto fossero di moda, questi programmi non hanno preso in considerazione il fabbisogno specifico del singolo individuo in termini di nutrizione portando ad una situazione di squilibrio e, di conseguenza, a risultati positivi, in termini di peso, solo per breve tempo e per pochi.  La conseguenza è stata che, nel tentativo di recuperare ciò di cui era stata privata, una volta che la dieta era terminata, la persona è tornata alle sue vecchie abitudini alimentari e di stile di vita nel tentativo di soddisfare questo fabbisogno.  Così facendo, centinaia di migliaia di persone, se non milioni, non solo hanno recuperato il peso precedentemente perso, ma hanno finito con il pesare persino più di quanto non pesassero al tempo in cui avevano iniziato il programma.

Per concludere, ora che abbiamo finalmente concordato che l’obesità è in effetti una malattia e dovrebbe essere trattata come tale, il nostro interesse principale dovrebbe essere, quali individui, comunità e nazione, lavorare insieme in termini di educazione e prevenzione.  “Prevenire è meglio che curare” recita un antico proverbio.  Malgrado ciò sia vero, la prevenzione non può aver luogo senza un’educazione appropriata circa sane abitudini alimentari e di stili di vita.  Tutto ciò dovrebbe iniziare sin dalla più giovane età, quindi all’asilo, al fine di istruire sia bambini che famiglie sulle proprietà dei cibi, il fabbisogno nutrizionale quotidiano, uno stile di vita equilibrato e proprio esercizio fisico.  Infatti, diventare consapevoli del modo appropriato di cibarsi, pur godendo della grande varietà di cibi e sostanze nutritive di cui il nostro corpo ha regolarmente bisogno, è fondamentale per la nostra salute.  Inutile dire che essere attivi, fare regolare esercizio fisico inziando con il camminare ogni singolo giorno ed evitando una pigra attitudine che è causa di uno stile di vita sedentario pericoloso e che ci danneggia impedendo al nostro corpo di bruciare le calorie in eccesso e che contribuisce alla lunga non solo all’obesità, ma anche, come abbiamo fino ad ora considerato, ad un numero infinito di problemi di salute incluse malattie degenerative, è fondamentale.

Alla fine, quindi, educare e prevenire sono fattori assolutamente necessari, benché la vera sfida per molte persone sia assumersi la responsabilità per la propria vita e, di conseguenza, per la propria salute.  Questo, tuttavia, è possibile solo per mezzo di uno sforzo congiunto tra volontà, determinazione, e consapevolezza sul da farsi e con l’iniziare a smettere di usare vecchi modi di ragionare e di giustificare cattive abitudini che hanno portato così tanti individui in particolare, e il nostro paese (USA) in generale, a detenere lo sfortunato primato mondiale di obesità e malattie ad essa correlate o da essa causate, rieducando le loro menti al fine di comprendere che l’obesità non è un semplice problema estetico, ma una vera e propria malattia che può e deve essere evitata e la cui manifestazione è, generalmente, non il risultato di un avverso destino, ma piuttosto di scelte e comportamenti non sani.



Maria Teresa De Donato©2013-2015. All Rights Reserved.


References

Balch, J. F. & Stengler, M. (2004). Prescription for NATURAL CURES. Obesity.
           
            (p. 390). Haboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc

Centers for Disease and Prevention (2013). Publications and Information Products.

            NCHS Data brief. Number 122, May 2013. Consumption of Added Sugars

            Among U.S. Adults, 2005-2010. (Author: R. Bethene Ervin & Cynthia L. Ogden).

            Retrieved July 29, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db122.htm
1.                    Marriott BP, Olsho L, Hadden L, Conner P. Intake of added sugars and selected nutrients in the United States, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2006. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 50(3):228–58. 2010.
2.                    Bowman SA. Diets of individuals based on energy intakes from added sugars. Family Economics and Nutrition Review. 12(2):31–8. 1999.
3.                    Vartanian LR, Schwartz MB, Brownell KD. Effects of soft drink consumption on nutrition and health: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Public Health 97:667–75. 2007.
5.                    Ervin RB, Kit BK, Carroll MD, Ogden CL. Consumption of added sugar among U.S. children and adolescents, 2005–2008. NCHS data brief, no 87. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2012.
6.                    Welsh JA, Sharma AJ, Grellinger L, Vos MB. Consumption of added sugars is decreasing in the United States. Am J Clin Nutr 94(3):726–34. 2011.
Day, P. (2007). Health Wars. The Hunzas (pp. 8-11). The Georgians (p. 11). The

            Karakorum (p. 11). The Abkasians and Ajerbaijanis (p. 12). War #4: Lifestyle

            (p. 55). War #7: Sugar – The White, the Pink and the Blue. Sucrose (The White).

            (p. 98). Tonbridge Kent, UK: Credence Publications

Earth Policy Insitute (2011). Release – Plan B Update May 25, 2011. (Author: Janet

            Larsen). Retrieved July 18, 2013 from


Holford, P. (2004). The New OPTIMUM NUTRTION Bible. (Second Edition).

            Chapter 7: The Myth of the Well-Balanced Diet (p. 44). Chapter 36: Breaking the

            Fat Barrier (pp. 316, 317). New York, NY: Crossing Press/Random House, Inc.

Pitchford, P. (2002). Healing with Whole Foods – Asian Tradition and Modern Nutrition

            (Third Edition). Section 1: Whole Foods. The Incalculable Value of Unrefined

            Plant Foods: Mineral Deficiencies in the Land of Excess (pp. 8, 9). Chapter 11:

            Sweeteners. The Misuse of Sugar (p. 189). Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books

The Free Online Medical Dictionary (2013).  Obesity. Retrieved July 10, 2013 from


The Guardian (2006). China’s alarming increase in obesity blamed on more afferent

            lifestyle (Author: James Randerson. Published August 17, 2006). Retrieved July


The New York Times (2013). A.M.A. Recognizes Obesity as a Disease. (Author:

            Andrew Pollack – Published June 18, 2013). Retrieved July 1st, 2013 from
           

Trivieri, L. & Anderson, J. W. (2002). Alternative Medicine – The Definitive Guide
           
            (Second Edition). Diet and Self Image (p. 826). Berkeley, CA: Celestial Arts